Your Cycle

 

Basic Reproductive Anatomy

Hormones of the Menstrual Cycle

Cervix Throughout the Cycle

View Into the Vagina During Cervical Self-Exam 

Fertility Awareness Methods

 

Basic Reproductive Anatomy

uterus diagram

Image Source



The uterus is a muscular organ that lies within the pelvis between the bladder and rectum.  It is shaped like upside-down pear and is about the size of a fist in a non-pregnant woman.  The uterus is composed of the fundus (dome shaped portion above the tubes), the body (largest tapering central portion) and the cervix (opening into the vagina).

If a woman inserts a speculum into her vagina and opens it, she will see her (beautiful!) cervix, which looks like a little pink doughnut about 3-6 inches from the opening her vagina.  The cervix is the lowermost part of the uterus that extends into the vagina and connects the uterus to the top of the vaginal wall (that’s right – the vagina is a sealed cavity and doesn’t open into the abdomen – you can’t lose a tampon or condom within it).  The cervix opens to the vagina via an internal os and an external os, though the external os is the only one visible upon cervical self-exam – it is the little hole in the center of the doughnut. The inner canal of the cervix, which you also can’t see upon speculum exam, is lined with glands that produce secretions that vary in consistency and quality throughout the cycle.  The quality (color, consistency, texture) of this fluid gives us accurate information about our current fertility or possibly an infection.

The uterus is made of three layers of tissue.  The outer layer is called the perimetrium (or serosa) which becomes the broad ligament on either side (shown as the yellow sheet-like structure in the image above). The bulky middle layer of the uterus, called the myometrium, is composed of three muscle layers, which are thickest at the fundus and thinnest at the cervix.  Pound for pound, the uterus is the strongest muscle in the female body.  Amazingly, the thin muscle of cervix thins and dilates with the rhythmic contractions of labor allowing the os to open to 10 cm (much like a head being pushed through a tight turtleneck shirt).  The incredibly powerful muscles of the fundus push the baby from within the uterus into the vagina during labor and as it is birthed through the vulva.  The innermost lining of the uterus is called the endometrium and it creates a thick, specialized tissue each cycle that is shed during menstruation.  It is this velvety nourishing tissue that becomes the site where the placenta grows during pregnancy to nourish the fetus. 

Branching from the top of the uterus, there are two oviducts (also called uterine or Fallopian tubes) that open to body of the uterus.  The oviducts are muscular passageways that help sweep the egg from the ovary to the uterus at ovulation.  At the end of the oviducts are finger-like structures called fimbriae, which move over the surface of the ovary to engulf the egg released during ovulation- this looks like a sea anemone moving in the ocean.

The fimbriae nestle two ovaries, which are organs about the size of almonds.  Each ovary holds many follicles, or tiny sacks that contain immature eggs, which are not visible to the naked eye. 

It is estimated that women are born with about 1-3 million immature eggs, called oocytes or follicles, that live within the ovaries. Unlike a man who produces his sex cells (sperm) every day, a woman is born with a certain number of sex cells that gradually die over time beginning in infancy and continuing through menopause. When a woman first gets her period at puberty, only about 400,000 follicles remain in her ovaries. With each menstrual cycle, a thousand follicles are lost and (usually) only one follicle will actually mature into an ovum (egg), which is released into the oviduct, marking ovulation.  Depending on how many of her reproductive years are spent pregnant or not ovulating due breastfeeding, it is estimated that between only about 400 of the original 1-3 million will ever mature into ova.

 

Hormones of the Menstrual Cycle

The menstrual cycle is a complex interaction of the six key hormones (chemical messengers) that affect changes in the reproductive organs (uterus, ovaries, breasts, and oviducts).  It is divided into three distinct phases: the follicular, ovulation, and the luteal phases.

The length of a menstrual cycle – counted from the beginning of one menstrual period to the beginning of the next – can be different for each woman or change from cycle to cycle for the same woman. You will see that many menstrual cycle diagrams represent a 28 day cycle, which is an average, but a healthy menstrual cycle can vary between 21-35 days.

Screen shot 2013-10-28 at 5.59.50 PMImage Source

Follicular Phase

The menstrual cycle begins when a woman begins bleeding, often called getting her period. The menstrual fluid contains blood, cervical mucus, vaginal secretions, and endometrial tissue, though most people just refer to it as blood.  At this point, estrogen and progesterone are the lowest they will be throughout the cycle.  Menstruation marks the beginning of the follicular phase, which ends at ovulation.  The length of the follicular phase is variable and can be affected by diet, stress, or illness.

Triggered by a complex series of chemical signals, the pituitary gland in the brain begins to secrete two key hormones, Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) and Lutenizing Hormone (LH).  The increase in FSH and LH cause about 10-20 of the follicles within the ovaries to begin to mature and they too release a hormone, called estrogen or estradiol.  Levels of estrogen in the body steadily increase as the follicles continue to mature for about a week – this estrogen causes the lining of the uterus to begin to thicken.  Usually only one of the maturing follicles becomes dominant, as it is most sensitive to estrogen, LH, and FSH.  When the estrogen level reaches a certain threshold, it triggers the pituitary gland to release a large amount of LH. 

Cervical fluid in the follicular phase is typically scant or tacky.  For many women who are tracking cervical position, the cervix feels hard, closed, and low.  As ovulation approaches, the cervical fluid becomes more watery and lubricative/slippery and stretchy like raw eggwhites and the cervix begins to soften. 

Ovulation

The spike in LH (seen as the peak in the green line on the graph below) cause the fully mature dominant follicle to burst through the wall of the ovary.  The release of the mature ovum is called ovulation.  Some women literally feel ovulation and experience ‘mittlesmertz,’ or a slight pain in one of their ovaries during ovulation. 

The cervical mucous near ovulation is typically very stretchy, slippery, and clear (looks and feels like eggwhites).  This fertile fluid helps the sperm move toward the egg and protects sperm from the acidity of the vagina, which would normally kill them. The cervix feels higher, softer, and more open.

Luteal Phase

The mature ovum released from the ovary at ovulation is swept by the fimbriae into the oviduct by rhythmic muscular movement of the oviduct, where it will live for about 24 hours if not fertilized by sperm.  The remains of the dominant follicle in the ovary is called the corpus luteum and produces large amounts of progesterone during the luteal phase.  The length of the luteal phase is not variable and typically lasts 14 days for most women, though a range of between 12-16 days is considered normal. 

If conception or implantation does not occur, the corpus luteum in the ovary will shrivel about 14 days after ovulation and will cause a sharp decrease in both estrogen and progesterone, triggering the onset of menstruation and the beginning of a new menstrual cycle.  The unfertilized ovum is about the size of a grain of sand; it is shed as part of the menstrual fluid.

Progesterone is high during the luteal phase; it is a heat inducing hormone and thus raises the basal body temperature (BBT) by several tenths of a degree for the duration of the cycle.  The jump in basal body temperature that remains steady indicates a woman has ovulated.

The cervix feels low, firm, and closed during the luteal phase.

Conception 

In order for conception to occur, semen must first survive the acidity of the vagina (fertile cervical fluid changes the vaginal pH to be more alkaline and sperm friendly) and then swim through the cervical canal into the body of the uterus and then into the oviduct to greet a woman’s egg.  If an ovum is fertilized by sperm in the oviduct (called conception), the fertilized egg (blastocyst) migrates into the uterine lining, where it will implant approximately 7 to 14 days after ovulation.  The corpus luteum will continue to provide high levels of progesterone to support pregnancy until the placenta takes over that job in approximately 12 weeks. 

 

How does the cervix change throughout the cycle?

If you’re already charting your menstrual cycle, checking the position and texture of your cervix each day can help you confirm where you are in your cycle. If you’re not already charting, have a feel anyway – its a great skill to have in your empowered woman toolbox! 

Here’s how to feel your cervix:

  • Wash your hands
  • Squat or stand with one foot raised on a stool.
  • Insert your longest finger into your vagina until you feel your cervix. It will feel like a protruding nub/cylinder toward the back of the soft walls of your vagina. If your finger is long enough, you should be able to circle your finger all the way around the cervix and feel a little dent in the middle of it (called the os, the opening to the uterus).
  • Note the following:
    •  How deep in your vagina is your cervix resting? (How much of your finger is inside of you?)
    • Does your cervix feel soft, like pursed lips, or more firm, like the tip of your nose?
    • Is your cervix angled to one side or aligned more centrally?
    • Does your os feel slightly open and squishy or squeezed shut?

While menstruating, the cervix may feel firm and low and the os open as it releases blood. It may be angled to one side slightly. Once all the blood has been shed, the os again feels closed.

As ovulation nears, the rising levels of estrogen cause the ligaments that attach the uterus to the pelvis to tighten and pull the uterus up further into the body. Hence, the cervix gradually draws deeper in the vagina and if often harder to reach near ovulation. The cervix may feel softer (like pursed lips) be more centrally aligned, and the os slightly open. 

After ovulation, estrogen levels drop and the cervix usually resumes feeling low, firm, and closed until she gets her period a few weeks later. It is not uncommon for the cervix to be tilted to one side.

Not all women follow this pattern exactly so don’t worry if you don’t. For example, women with retroverted (tipped) uteruses may find thier cervix easier to reach near ovulation and women who have given birth vaginally usually have softer cervices throughout the cycle. Its empowering just to know what is normal for you.  You may notice your cervical changes vary from cycle to cycle or that you have a consistent pattern that aligns with your other symptoms of fertility (cervical fluid and basal body temperature).  

The key is to check every day so you can feel the relative differences from day to day; cervical changes can be very subtle. Check your cervix in the same position and at the same time each day (i.e. in a squat before showering in the morning), so you’re comparing apples to apples – or cervices to cervices, as the case may be. 

 View of the same cervix during Infertile and Fertile Phases

 

Source: Fertility UK

 

View Into the Vagina During Cervical Self-Exam 

What Are Fertility Awareness Methods?

Men produce about 1000 sperm per second and are thus considered fertile everyday.  A man’s ejaculate contains between 50-500 million sperm. Conception can only occur when one of these live sperm meets a woman’s live egg. 

Women ovulate (release an egg) once per menstrual cycle and the egg lives a maximum of 24 hours. For a few days prior to ovulation, tiny glands in the cervix called cervical crypts produce fertile cervical fluid (a wet, often slippery, raw eggwhite consistency). This fertile cervical fluid can help sperm survive for up to five days in the vagina as they patiently wait for the egg to be released. So, even though her egg itself only lives for about a day or less, women are considered to have a ‘fertile window’ when they are producing fertile cervical fluid – meaning that intercourse/insemination in that window of time could lead to conception if the sperm stay alive (for a few hours or even days) in the fertile fluid and then make their way into the Fallopian tube to fertilize the egg after ovulation.

Fertile quality fluid stretched between fingersThere are a variety of methodologies for calculating a woman’s natural fertility windows, both religious and secular – collectively they are called Fertility Awareness Methods (FAM) or Natural Family Planning (NFP).  Some are less accurate and based on guessing a women’s fertility based on averages of past cycles (Calendar methods/the Rhythm Method/many period tracker Apps).  Some are based in checking cervical fluid only (the Ovulation Method).  A very effective practice is called the Symptothermal Method (STM) of FAM and is based on the scientific facts that hormonal fluxes during a woman’s menstrual cycle cause observable changes in the quality of her cervical fluid and a rise in her basal body temperature (BBT, or temperature upon waking) after ovulation. 

In practice, STM is relatively simple: throughout the day, a woman notices and records the sensation and quality of her cervical fluid as it appears at her vulva or on her toilet paper after wiping. On this chart, she also records her basal body temperature, taken orally, vaginally or under her armpit when she first wakes up in the morning. Optionally, some women also check the firmness and depth of their cervix within their vagina to confirm the other two fertility signs on their charts.  

STM takes about 4-8 hours to learn, either through reading a book, taking a workshop or during one-on-one lessons with a teacher/mentor. Once initial guidelines are understood, STM takes a commitment of about 2 minutes a day to maintain and interpret data on her chart. 

STM can become an empowering path of enhancing a woman’s overall body literacy, increasing communication with her partner, and gauging her overall health. STM can be used as a natural form of birth control, to help achieve pregnancy, and to find underlying health issues that may be affecting the regularity of her cycles or her fertility overall. 

84 thoughts on “Your Cycle

  1. Thanks for sharing something so very personal!! Mysterious and changeable… It is reasssuring to know more about that which makes us women in a very real and physical sense.

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  2. In early pregnancy if you were to feel for your cervix what position would it be in.. I know it is not recommended to check but I wanted to ask because i keep reading HIGH soft and slightly open low hard and open?

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  3. This cycle I used the clear blue digital ovulation test on March 28th and got a positive LH surge. My temp on the 28th was 97F, follewed by these temps fews days after
    29th- 97.2
    30th- 97.3
    31st- 97.7
    April 1st- 98
    2nd-97.1
    3rd 97.6
    4th 97.6
    As you can see I had a pretty big temp drop on the 2nd which seems like the 5th or 6th day after ovulation. My cervix is high and soft. I just wanted to know why this dip in temp happened? Its never happened to me before so I’m confused.

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    beautifulcervix Reply:

    Having one or two temperatures outlying the normal pattern is not a cause for concern – refer to the Rule of Thumb in Toni Weschler’s Taking Charge of Your Fertility.

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    Chris Reply:

    Are you trying to conceive? I know some women experience a brief dip in temps when experiencing implantation, not always, but some times.

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  4. I found this site educational! Seeing as I’m trying to figure out a few things hormonally since BC really jacked me up lol Not fun times. Thanks :)

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  5. Hello Im 21 years old and i decided to look for my cervix today beacus iv been having wierd cramps only on the left side. So I read this cite and a few others before trying then i grabbed tissue washed my hands and went for it! So my cervix was facing downwards and it didnt have a hole like the ones in the pictures. So I dont give up easy i reach in again and this time i try to retrieve a fluid sample! And the wierd thing is the fluid wasnt any of the options i found on the cite! It was dark brown and watery so im confused! I may be pregnant i was intimate last on the seventh and i have been nauseated for the past three days every morning but im still confused on my fluid!Please help!

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    Jess Reply:

    I get dark brown discharge every now and again. My Gynie said its “old blood,” whatever was left over from your previous menstrual cycle that your body didn’t slough off. I’ve had it all stages of my cycle, before, during, after, and instead of. It varies in consistency but always seems to have a heavily metallic scent with me.

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  6. As weird as it may sound, how do I check my cervix? I see some women saying there’s is high and to the left it low, how do I kno what to do “in there” . Me and my Hubby to b are TTC and I think checking my cervix and my mucus can help us, btw I love your site!! Was recommend to us from my pink pad app.
    Thnx
    Rae

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  7. I have been trying to conceive for about 3 or 4 months now it seems that I can never catch myself during ovulation the last time I had my period was in August right now through your site I’ve learned that my cm is creamy & has small amount of cm as well .. I’m wondering if this means I am leading up to ovulation I’m getting frustrated and also a bit disappointed when I get my period I’m hoping I don’t get it this month if so this means I’m pregnant my breast are full and feel like a water balloon I’ve been feeling warmer than usual please help

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  8. I recently became interested in checking my cervix while trying to track my ovulation. Some of the methods used rely on cervix position and I am/was unsure how to determine this. After going through your site, I now feel a bit more comfortable about checking it.

    The one question I do have is how can I best tell (with out running out and buying a speculum) what position my uterus is in? I have a feeling that mine may be in a more irregular position, due to the fact that my husband and I have had unprotected sex for many years, and have only resulted in one (normal and healthy) pregnancy. We’re trying for our second and last child and have not had any luck at all. I know I ovulate every month, my cycle is 28.5 days ish (I could almost set a clock to it) and rarely have a month where I’m later than 2-3 days. Any suggestions?

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    beautifulcervix Reply:

    Getting pregnant can be such a mystery! You OB/GYN may have noted if your uterus is in a retroverted or tipped position – you could ask her. There is information out there that suggests that this is a variation of normal and will not affect your chances of conceiving, but also information about how having an aligned uterus is ideal/has helped some women. Since it seems you are having trouble conceiving, you might want to check out Mayan Abdominal Massage – The Avrigo technique – if you are concerned about abnormal positioning. Or perhaps there are holistic practitioners, like acupuncturists, naturopaths, or holistic endocrinologists near you who can help you out.

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  9. Hi
    First of all i’ll like to say i really like this site, as it’s very educating about our bodies. My question is, is it possible to have a very normal cycle such as in every 28,5days and still not be able to get pregnant? does that indicate anything like me ovulating in any way at all? i have been to the docs and all i have heard so far is that all is well and to give it time but we have been trying for a year and half now with no success. please help, thank.

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    beautifulcervix Reply:

    You can track your basal body temperature and cervical fluid to confirm if you are ovulating each month. Please check out the Garden of Fertility or Taking Charge of Your Fertility, available here:
    http://www.beautifulcervix.com/resources/

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  10. I was turned to this website by my anatomy and physiology teacher last year. He believes that every woman should know how and understand how her cycle works, in order to empower her, and to teach her valuable lessons about life. And I am so glad that he did! I’m starting to chart my own cycles and this site is going a long way in helping me understand how it works. I’m 25, and my Husband and I are trying to conceive, so this will definitely help us understand why it is taking so long! Thank you for putting this website up and making it available to everyone!

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  11. Am just sooooooooooooooo very grateful because ah few things i was concerned about is right here with all the explanations i needed thank u very much an MAY GOD CONTINUE TO BLESS U :)

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  12. Hi.. This site is fantastic! Im 28 and Ive been ttc for just under a year now, i had a loop biopsy last feb but have recently had a clear smear, so all is good there 😀
    I have very irregular periods which range from 28-42 days which makes it very hard to predict when im ov but me and my hubby to b have sex daily but still no joy :(. ive had 2 children and fell first time with both of them, they are 8 & 9yrs old. 2 years ago i fell pregnant but sadly miscarried which resulted in having to have a D&C, could this have something to do with why i cant concieve do u think?

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  13. fascinating…natural family planning and the ability to check my cervical mucus were what got me pregnant so quickly with my 2 sons now 7 months old and 2 years old! never failed!

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  14. i was wondering what causes this. my cervix was low until two days before ovulation, i had sex the three days before ovulation. i had weird twinges and so on. my cervix has been high from ovulation through my period. my period ended early this morning and i checked it and it has yet to go lower again. is it possible that it was implantation bleeding?

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  15. This is a great website. It would help men understand women much better as regards reproductive health, family planning, emotional needs and why not, also reduce sexual violence! I can tell you that this site increases my understanding of my wife after thirty years. Keep it up.

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  16. Your site is very good,I really love it, But please I need an advice, my cycle is 25days and is regular, I and my hubby have been ttc for 7months now but no result, and also after about 6hours after sex,I still see some sperm coming out from my vagina, I don’t know if is normal and also when will I likely to be ovulating since my cycle is 25days and my bleeding last for 3days. Thanks

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  17. I am. 34. Been trying for like 7 months now. My first is 2 now. Tried to feel my cervix but am. Still learning. So happy to see your site

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  18. Fantastic site, just what every woman of every age should have a peek at, thanks to the women that participated! I have one little question, I ve a prelapsed bladder (through being overweight and flexible) :/ do how would you guys propose self-examination? It seems hard to reach.. I’ve looked in the mirror, but I don’t have one if those pull-you-open-a-jiggees. I’m ttc, and had 2 children previous to this prprolapse. Thank you

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    beautifulcervix Reply:

    You can order a speculum here:
    http://www.beautifulcervix.com/see-your-own-beautiful-cervix/

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  19. I have never even thought about my cervix until I was looking up pregnancy videos on youtube and came across a link to this site. THis site has been eye opening and Im glad I found it

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  20. Pingback: Intense Symptoms During TWW? - Page 2

  21. Thanks your post was really helpful.

    I and my partner have been trying to conceive for couple of years now, am 34 and he is 38, we have gone through all the neccessary test mine came out good but thats without the tubal test, and his was not good, the doctor comfirmed he has varicocele, the operation was successfully done and there was an increase of sperms from 12 % to 60 % so the doctor advised we try for a year which we did but yet stil there was no good news.
    So we had to go for the insermination which i had last month but its unfortunate that it didnt work and i wil be going for another insermination this month. Am so stressed up and scared, sometimes i have this fear in me that may be the doctor didnt run my test well and like sometime is wrong with me.
    Pls i need your advice

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  22. I’m 26 with a 29 year old fiance, and an 8 year old stepaughter. My fiance and I have been together almost 7 years. 4 years in we got pregnant, but I didn’t feel we were ready for a baby, we weren’t financially stable and didn’t have a place of our own. We ended up having an abortion, which I have regretted ever since. It wasn’t 2 months after the abortion when we realized as a couple it was a mistake and we’ve been TTC ever since.

    Before the abortion you could set a clock to my period. Cramps the day before and at the end of that day brown discharge, 5-6 days of regular to heavy period, brown discharge, then cramps. I always started around the 15th give or take a day. Postabortion? My vagina hates me. I’m so irregular I always carry a liner, a overnight pad, and a couple heavy tampons in my bag because I never know when I’ll start. I went 8 months, spotting to heavy bleeding. “Periods” (defined as bleeding so heavy I bled through a heavy tampon and 2 overnight pads in under an hour, and yes the pads were layered on top of each other) could last 3 weeks straight, followed by 2 weeks of spotting and then back to the heavy bleeding. Cramps were so unbearable I’d call out of work and stay in bed on a heating pad crying all day. My gynie finally suggested a D&C, which worked for about a month then it was back to the same old same old. Its been 2 years. My cycle is still irregular but the bleeding is more bearable, more predictable. I go 3-4 months period free, and periods last 10-14 days, light to moderately heavy bleeding. Cramps are random.

    Since my gynie has no insight on my “problem” he referred me to a local hospital, who refuses to call me back. I’ve given up on internal medicine and feel its time for some grassroots. I hope I can learn enough about my cervix to have a baby before menopause (women in my family go through it way early, between 37 and 45). There was a time I wanted to have 2, now I’ll be thrilled to manage 1.

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    beautifulcervix Reply:

    I hear this is hard and frustrating for you. You might consider an acupuncturist or naturopath who might help you rebalance your hormones naturally to optimize your fertility/cycle. Also, it is very common for women to have psychosomatic reactions to procedures – it sounds like there is a lot of grief and disharmony that might be helped by seeking a supportive therapist/counsellor (particularly a somatic therapist if there is one near you) to help you process the abortion – often doing emotional work/clearing affects our physical body. Good luck!

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  23. Hi ladies, I’m after some advice!

    Currently I am on cycle day 10. I have been tracking my CP for 3months now. Normally at this stage my cervix is low and I’m feeling quite dry. However, this cycle (and for a while in my last cycle) my cervix has been practically unreachable. I just about managed to touch it this evening and it was high, soft, closed and wet. I’ve been led to believe that this is a sign of pregnancy. My fiancé and I are trying to conceive but I’m sure I had a period lastmonth… Any ideas?? Xx

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  24. Very useful site! Just curious to know if fertile cervical mucus can be white ? or does it need to be clear in colour ? i have a lot of whitish streaked yellowish / clear cervical mucus and alot of it around my cervix ? It is also very stretchy and slimey but not clear ? Is this fertile mucus as i’m quite confused ? I’ve heard of the transition stage before it turns clear but this mucus is very stretchy can stretch about 3 n half inches or more between my fingers but like i say it is white and not clear ??

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  25. how do u take pictures of your cervix? do u need a special cam to get in there good?

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    beautifulcervix Reply:

    We used a regular point and shoot on macro setting. A headlamp and a speculum.

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  26. Just saw your post on cervical mucuos of 25yr old and i am impress. Am really having problem observing these CM. I don’t usually see my eggwhite and i only know when am ovulating through scan. Also from the images, my CM especially the creamy fluid does not occur regularly, atimes its not as heavy as what am seeing on those images. I normally check with my finger when taking my night bath (hope its ok). How do i differentiate Dry, Sticky, Creamy, Watery & Egg-white (Pictures if you have them). Am checking my bbt chart with thermometre.

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  27. I will definitely refer all my female friends to this site. It is empowering to know so much abut your own body and not have to run to a doctor for everything and feel clueless. Good Job!xo

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  28. Hi my name is kayla im 20 years old me and my fiancee are trying to conceve sry it was spelt wrong . We have been trying for at least 2 1/2 years . I had a miscarrage at the begging of feb lost it . The doctors said they didnt understand why either .. any way i checked my cervix and its odd because in all honisty one part is tough and the other side of it is soft … any one know what it means .. i have a watery cream discharge or cm idk what the difference is . Could i be pregnant af isnt dew until 17 but my emotions r all wacky lord i pray its pregnancy we wanna be parents so bad but with movies ive watched i dont have a good chance maybe 10% chance we r both healthy hes a marine and well i exercize with him lol ty please help !!!

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    beautifulcervix Reply:

    For all those women trying to conceive, I highly recommend reading the book “Taking Charge of your Fertility” by Toni Weschler so you can have an easier way of understanding when you’re fertile and most likely to conceive. You can order it here through amazon.com :
    http://www.beautifulcervix.com/resources/

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  29. Me and my fiance have been trying since for about 4you months with no luck… about six months ago i lost a baby at 12the week( no dnc they said my body should do it naturally) i have 2to children which were both csections my period is very regular yet still no results with charting any suggestions?

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  30. Hi,

    I need help! My DH and I have been ttc for nearly a year and due to my extreme frustration I started the insanity workout which has actually been helping me to cope by taking focus off the ttc. We had intercourse on May 4th then AF came the following day with normal length but more painful than usual. I normally have a 30day cycle and now it’s the 7th June and no AF. So even though I had AF after intercourse last mth I am wondering if the intensity of the workouts could have affected my ovulation and if I could be pregnant. Usually I have premenstrual symptoms up 1wk before AF but this mth I only started having cramping and back aches the day after AF was due and still having the cramping days later and no AF. I don’t usually check my cervix but when I did just not it felt high and soft (I think). I love this site so informative. Please give me your opinion on wether you think I may be pregnant. I really am dreading the sight of a BFN so I’m delaying testing as long as possible.

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  31. im day 29 into my cycle why is my cervix so high up my husband cant even reach it (as he always checks it for me)its soft and closed ive never had a baby…

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  32. I have been TTC for 1 yr. I decide to try natural herbs andi like the results , but I’m not preggo yet . I started exploring my body because we’re gonna try home insemenation . I’m having trouble finding my os I see my cervix . I’ve always been told I have a tilted uterus ??? By more than just one doc. I recently order a large speculum hopefully this will do the trick. Any suggestion ????

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  33. When I shower, I tend to put my fingers inside and clean out the discharge. When I first touched the cervix I thought I might have a deformity. Stressed out going to obygyn and it was nothing! My question – is it okay to wash away the cervical fluid daily during baths with only water? During certain sexual positions, when my husband touches the cervix it hurts, is that normal?

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  34. Hello! I had sex on d 11th day of my menstrual cYcle with d pennis outside my vagina (I didn’t allow Him penetrate) but he released d sperm outside my vagina. I saw a pinkish red Blood on d 16th daY of menstrual cycle, does this indicate ovulation bleeding or implantation bleeding. Tanx in anticipation for the reply.

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  35. I’ve had spotting the past 2 months. Yet I haven’t had sex For much longer. My cervix is high and feels somewhat open. Any ideas as to what is goin on?

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    beautifulcervix Reply:

    If you’re having irregular spotting, please get checked out by your doctor – could be a polyp, fibroids, a hormonal imbalance or something else.

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  36. I have just had abnormal cells removed ! ! Will this decrease my changes of getting pregnant again ! im 35 yrs ! ! With one child ! of 8 !

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  37. This website has helped me understand the logistics of my body with far more intimacy than has been achieved through various doctors. Its so good to know and understand what im feeling when i examine myself and where my IDU sits. education is the way forward!!!

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  38. I am on day 7 of my cylce i have the copper iud my july cylce was 2wks late had 2 positive pregnacey tests an 8 negative ones wen my peirod turned up it was extreamly heavy to the point i had to wear my daughters nappies with it being so heavy so by the pain n heavyness of the bleed i missedcarried , i have three daughters too age 2 ,4 &6 years so not in no rush for any more babies , however this month my bleed was shorter 6day but very heavy for 2 days were i resorted to useing baby nappies than a pad just so i dont bleed out them like usuall , but i really want my coil removed as i think this is were my problems lie , does any one else suffer the same x as im no good with the pill or implant

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  39. Wow, what a wonderful site. The way you talk about the topic gets me thinking about words and cultural attitudes.

    For instance, I’ve come to think that “fuck” was a reaction to “love making” which expresses shame of the generation that relied on it as a forced “nice” moralistic way of putting it (you can only have sex with “love” thereby making every other reason “not nice”). Both attitudes are opposite sides of the same coin – one moralistic and the other violently anti-moralistic, and neither really gets to the heart of the matter and does it justice. A term, like “mating” is much closer, and I kind of find this perspective here, in the Beautiful Cervix site.

    To call a matter-of-fact term like “cervix” “beautiful” recognizes the truth of it, and frees it and everything it alludes to to be regarded more genuinely as part of a woman’s beauty and fascination, and even a source of true, personal eroticism – it can be deeply exciting to feel that you are part of that ancient, fundamental cycle.

    Thanks you everyone for an incredibily refreshing site!

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  40. I am having questions about the cervix also. My cervix seems to stay in the same place and I an’t really tell if it’s open or closed High or low soft or hard. Can someone please explain how to know the diffence I do have 5 kids and had 3 of the normally and 2 cseation.

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  41. So I have been checking my cervix regularly for the past year. My cervix are always pretty low. For instance during the ovulation time the highest my cervix have ever been was about half my used finger up. Usually my periods are always extremely heavy and cervix low and firm. However, this month I started spotting yesterday and checked my cervix and I had to insert my whole index finger to feel it and it was really soft! I checked again again today and no change. I’m wondering if its normal to change like that..

    [Reply]

    Deidra Reply:

    Also I do have the implanon birth control implant that doesn’t need to be removed until July. So I highly doubt I’m pregnant!

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  42. What will happen if I have unprotected srx during ovulation but he didn’t come inside of me?

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    Kelly Reply:

    You will get pregnant. I did. It was only two days after my period. There is enough sperm in the pre-ejaculate fluid to get a girl pregnant, believe me.

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  43. I have been checking my cervical position almost daily the past 6 months. It’s always high at ovulation, and low during menstruation, but it’s also high even right before I get my period. And a lot of times around ovulation it is hard. It’s almost never soft. This week, I finally found that I had SHOW right on my predicted ovulation day! I was so excited! Then it got hard again a couple days later, and now it is soft again. Is it supposed to change from hard to soft? Also, my cervical fluid is pretty much always white… Very rarely do I see clear. But I know I’m very fertile! I have had three unplanned pregnancies :)

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  44. Pingback: Learn To Trust Your Body: The Roses Of Fertility Awareness | SuzyKnew

  45. This page is great! I’m here searching for information about how to use the menstrual cup in a good way because it’s my first time with it and this makes me realize that I know where my cervix is and I have touched it a lot of times.

    Now I feel more comfortable thinking that the next time that I try to put it I will know where I need to do it.

    Thanks a lot, all of you!!

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  46. Pingback: February Testers 2014! - Page 16

  47. i feel really lucky, i havent been allowed hormonal methods of birth control since i was about 17. i followed my periods and cycle to not get pregnant and reversed the method to get pregnant :) the fact pregancy happend first time both times i put to 2 things, knowing how i “feel” i wasnt checking my cervix then, but checking how i felt hormonal wise :)
    now my cervix has changed thanks to childbirth hence my doula friend directed me to you,
    we need to get back in touch with our bodies :) this website is great example of that.

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  48. This website is very informative! I learned a lot, but I have a question that never seems to get answered not by my doctors or any website. I feel like I have a lot of liquid that occurs randomly ,and it’s not a weird color it’s just like how you described on this website. It’s hardly ever clear, it’s majority of the time cloudy, Is something wrong with my cervix?

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    D Reply:

    Cloudy or opaque cervical mucous is common. “Creamy” or “tacky” cervical mucous is often cloudy if not outright opaque, and “egg white” cervical mucous can be a little cloudy as well.

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  49. I am finding all of this very confusing. I have been checking my cervix for quite some time now. The positioning changes however, I do not get ewcm and my cervix almost always feels open. I am 30 and have only had 2 pregnancies. One at 19 that I carried full term and the other at 29 that I miscarried at 9 weeks. I fear that I may not have another child. Is something wrong with me?

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  50. I honestly find feeling for my cervix to be incredibly frustrating, I don’t know where it is . What it will feel like, nothing. Isve read what it says on here, but that is no help honestly. I still don’t know what I’m feeling for, maybe I’ve felt it but I’m not sure.

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  51. Pingback: On Your Mark, Get Set, Prepare ~ Preparing to Conceive | Ramblings of an all American Wife

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